Always Time for Tea – Part 3: Ogof Capel

2016-08-07

Paul is one of the keyholders for Ogof Capel, one of the Welsh caves that Rostam had mentioned to me on one of his visits to the states and it sounded amazing. Sadly, trips are limited to three (leader plus two), so Footleg couldn’t join. He and Peter decided to hike around the valley some while we caved.

The entrance for Ogof Capel is terrible. Let me just say that again. It is terrible. It’s not just crawling, it’s crawling around and over and under rocks and cobbles. You can’t drag a pack behind you despite it being basically belly/army crawl size, because it gets too caught (even a swaygo). So you have to keep one arm out in front to push it ahead of you, and not just push, but lift it up and over and around. Going in it is uphill, so it is a major struggle. I wondered if I should have stayed at the Stump and had more tea instead!

But then it finally opened to where I could kind of walk, and then finally properly walk. But it was narrow and wet and arrows pointing to go under, luckily, water was low and so it was just a chest-dipper not an ear-dipper. All of a sudden…PRETTIES. Wow. I admitted to Paul it was worth the work to get there. Crystal clear, pure white, long soda straws with funky helectites dancing off of them. Never seen anything like it! all-the-strawsFerret standing among the long amazing straws!

 

Ferret decided to stay in that straw chamber while Paul and I continued on towards the back of the cave. First was a sideways crawl in water up to my neck for about 40 feet, and then a difficult climb up not that much easier than the slot I got stuck in inside Unterstein. Paul had to talk me through it some. But I made it and we continued on, dancing and ducking around formations, splashing into the streamway, and canyoning above it in other places. The entire cave is basically a narrow waterway canyon, never much more than body width.

toothpasteWeird green and blue toothpaste-like goop.

 

There were crystal balls on the ceiling that looked like someone threw snowflakes onto it. There was a crack with greens and blues as if someone squeezed a tube of toothpaste. We got to where the cave really narrowed and Paul said there wasn’t much past it, nothing any better than we’d already seen, so we turned back and started to take photos as we worked our way back up to where we had left Ferret.

dancing-strawsMore straws.

 

I took some really pretty photos but it is a kind hard area to light since most of the decorations are in a bend, and they are mostly “on top” of where the canyon cuts back at about 6-8 feet up to makes a shelf. Also, one has to be delicate because you can’t just get into them for close ups or you’d knock them!

fake-droplets-of-waterTiny helectites with solid crystal water-like “drops”.

 

Before heading back out, I set up a shot and handed Paul my camera to take a picture of me! I have loved getting so many shots with me in it on this trip, I guess this is the bonus of caving with other photographers.

amy-in-ogof-capelThe way out was not any more fun than the way in. I was literally doing 360’s as I was corkscrewing my way through. While Ferret and Paul could slither out straight, my wider hips required much more finesse, finding the right angles to move between the rock.

 

We got out of the cave to bright rare Welsh sunshine; lucky two days in a row! Peter was waiting at the entrance for us but Footleg had left, he had to get back to London area by 6pm. Figuring this may be the case, I had said goodbye before we went underground. It was lovely to finally meet the famous Footleg!

 

It was time to part with Paul and the rest as well. Folks had to get home and Ferret and I were going back to the Stump to stay two more nights. Ferret had arranged access to OFD with Vince for the next day. So we headed back and had a nice cuppa tea.